Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Committee

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The College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (CEPS) is committed to fostering an inclusive and welcoming community of faculty, staff and students in which everyone feels appreciated, respected, supported, and valued in decision-making processes. This kind of community promotes new ideas and perspectives critical to solving the engineering and physical science challenges facing society and the environment while advancing humankind.

In response to protests and outrage in our country following the murder of George Floyd in the summer of 2020, CEPS formed the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion committee. Our goal is to ensure that CEPS faculty, staff and students regardless of background or identity (including but not limited to race, country of origin, religious beliefs, socioeconomic status, ability, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression and other perceived or unperceived differences), are welcome and thrive.  We strongly believe that all people deserve access to a STEM education, but institutional bias and systemic racism have not always allowed it. 

Our goal is to help CEPS become a more inclusive community that enables an equitable and safe environment. Such an environment would create a scientifically and civically literate and just society and provide skills for functioning effectively in a variety of settings, here at UNH, and beyond. We want to ensure that all students gain experience and guidance in working with colleagues with a variety of perspectives.

Our committee’s objectives are to: 

1) support DEI committees and their activities in each department and assist in the coordination of their activities at the college level;  

2) work with UNH’s Office of Community, Equity and Diversity to hold annual trainings for the CEPS community and host regular college-wide discussions on DEI;  

3) promote inclusive teaching and research practices in our classrooms, research laboratories, and field experiences;  

4) foster a community that does not tolerate racism, discrimination or harassment through our code of conduct;  

5) ensure that invited seminar speakers represent the diversity in our fields; 

6) increase the recruitment, retention and support of those traditionally underrepresented in CEPS disciplines (e.g. women, Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC))  

These objectives are our starting point to ensure that we reach our collective goal of a safe and equitable community. CEPS and all of UNH thrive when our faculty, staff, and students have the opportunities, resources, and support they need to succeed.   

All faculty, staff, students and guests in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences shall treat each other with respect and collegiality. It is the goal of the college to create a welcoming, friendly, and inclusive environment for everyone, regardless of their appearance, age, background, ability, identity, race, national or ethnic origin, religious beliefs, socioeconomic status, gender identity and expression, or sexual orientation. It is our firm belief that no human being should have to endure discrimination, harassment, bullying, retaliation, unprofessional behavior, offensive words or actions, unwanted attention, or inappropriate physical contact. In addition to the negative effects on individuals, discrimination, harassment (in any form), and bullying create a hostile environment that reduces the quality, integrity, and pace of the advancement of science, mathematics, and engineering by marginalizing individuals and communities. 

Creating a positive environment is the responsibility of every person in the college. While free speech toward genuine intellectual growth and exploration is protected and encouraged, speech that does not foster mutual respect or uphold the dignity of all individuals prevents the healthy exchange of ideas and will be considered in violation of this code of conduct.  

If you are aware of any violation of this code of conduct, please take appropriate action and report the incident by contacting the Affirmative Action and Equity Office (AAEO) at affirmaction.equity@unh.edu or TEL (603) 862-2930 Voice / TTY Users 7-1-1 or log on to the ReportIt website: http://reportit.unh.edu/.Anonymous reports may be submitted. If you would like to discuss the issue with a member of the CEPS Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) committee, you can send an email to ceps.dei@unh.edu, however, you should be aware that the recipient of this email is required by law to report any incident of sexual violence, including sexual harassment, to the AAEO coordinator. 

Below is a list of additional resources for consideration. If you have an additional resource to add to the list, please contact us at 

UNH Community, Equity, and Diversity 

UNH Earth Sciences Department Diversity and Inclusion Committee 

UNH Affirmative Action and Equity Office 

Anti-Racism Training Module  

 

Kingsbury Hall

If you have observed or experienced an incident of bias or hate, discrimination and/or harassment, please report the incident using the reportit!_form or contact the Affirmative Action and Equity Office at affirmaction.equity@unh.edu or (603) 862-2930 Voice / (603) 862-1527 TTY / 7-1-1 Relay NH.

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We welcome the input, feedback and concerns of all in the CEPS community to include students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors. Please feel free to reach out to the committee at any time via email at ceps.dei@unh.edu

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